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Thread: Mada-Conficker (virus) di wake up!!

  1. #1
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    Mada-Conficker (virus) di wake up!!

    Giant Internet worm set to change tactics April 1

    SAN FRANCISCO - The fast-moving Conficker computer worm, a scourge of the Internet that has infected at least 3 million PCs, is set to spring to life in a new way on Wednesday April Fools' Day.

    That's when many of the poisoned machines will get more aggressive about "phoning home" to the worm's creators over the Internet. When that happens, the bad guys behind the worm will be able to trigger the program to send spam, spread more infections, clog networks with traffic, or try and bring down Web sites.

    Technically, this could cause havoc, from massive network outages to the creation of a cyberweapon of mass destruction that attacks government computers. But researchers who have been tracking Conficker say the date will probably come and go quietly.

    More likely, these researchers say, the programming change that goes into effect April 1 is partly symbolic an April Fools' Day tweaking of Conficker's pursuers, who for now have been able to prevent the worm from doing significant damage.

    "I don't think there will be a cataclysmic network event," said Richard Wang, manager of the U.S. research division of security firm Sophos PLC. "It doesn't make sense for the guys behind Conficker to cause a major network problem, because if they're breaking parts of the Internet they can't make any money."

    Previous Internet threats were designed to cause haphazard destruction. In 2003 a worm known as Slammer saturated the Internet's data pipelines with so much traffic it crippled corporate and government systems, including ATM networks and 911 centers.

    Far more often now, Internet threats are designed to ring up profits. Control of infected PCs is valuable on the black market, since the machines can be rented out, from one group of bad guys to another, and act as a kind of illicit supercomputer, sending spam, scanning Web sites for security holes, or participating in network attacks.

    The army of Conficker-infected machines, known as a "botnet," could be one of the greatest cybercrime tools ever assembled. Conficker's authors just need to figure out a way to reliably communicate with it.

    Infected PCs need commands to come alive. They get those commands by connecting to Web sites controlled by the bad guys. Even legitimate sites can be co-opted for this purpose, if hackers break in and use the sites' servers to send out malicious commands.

    So far, Conficker-infected machines have been trying to connect each day to 250 Internet domains the spots on the Internet where Web sites are parked. The bad guys need to get just one of those sites under their control to send their commands to the botnet. (The name Conficker comes from rearranging letters in the name of one of the original sites the worm was connecting to.)

    Conficker has been a victim of its success, however, because its rapid spread across the Internet drew the notice of computer security companies. They have been able to work with domain name registrars, which administer Web site addresses, to block the botnet from dialing in.

    Now those efforts will get much harder. On April 1, many Conficker-infected machines will generate a list of 50,000 new domains a day that they could try. Of that group, the botnet will randomly select 500 for the machines to actually query.

    The bad guys still need to get only one of those up and running to connect to their botnet. And the bigger list of possibilities increases the odds they'll slip something by the security community.

    Researchers already know which domains the infected machines will check, but pre-emptively registering them all, or persuading the registrars to neutralize all of them, is a bigger hurdle.

    "We expect something will happen, but we don't quite know what it will look like," said Jose Nazario, manager of security research for Arbor Networks, a member of the "Conficker Cabal," an alliance trying to hunt down the worm's authors.

    "With every move that they make, there's the potential to identify who they are, where they're located and what we can do about them," he added. "The real challenge right now is doing all that work around the world. That's not a technical challenge, but it is a logistical challenge."

    Conficker's authors also have updated the worm so infected machines have new ways to talk to each other. They can share malicious commands rather than having to contact a hacked Web site for instructions.

    That variation is important because it shows that even as security researchers have neutralized much of what the botnet might do, the worm's authors "didn't lose control of their botnet," said Michael La Pilla, manager of the malicious code operations team at VeriSign Inc.'s iDefense division.

    The Conficker outbreak illustrates the importance of keeping current with Internet security updates. Conficker moves from PC to PC by exploiting a vulnerability in Windows that Microsoft Corp. fixed in October. But many people haven't applied the patch or are running pirated copies of Windows that don't get the updates.

    Unlike other Internet threats that trick people into downloading a malicious program, Conficker is so good at spreading because it finds vulnerable PCs on its own and doesn't need human involvement to infect a machine.

    Once inside, it does nasty things. The worm tries to crack administrators' passwords, disables security software, blocks access to antivirus vendors' Web sites to prevent updating, and opens the machines to further infections by Conficker's authors.

    Someone whose machine is infected might have to reinstall the operating system.
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  2. #2
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    Don't fret about Conficker: Here's what to do


    The Conficker worm, a nasty computer infection that has poisoned millions of PCs, will start ramping up its efforts Wednesday to use those machines for cybercrimes. It's unclear whether everyday PC users will even notice, but this is as good an excuse as any to make sure your computer is clean.

    There are some easy ways to figure out whether a computer has the Conficker worm, and free tools available for getting rid of it.

    One scary thing about Conficker is that it spreads without human involvement, moving from PC to PC by exploiting a security hole in Microsoft Corp.'s Windows operating system. The hole was fixed in October, but if your computer doesn't get automatic updates from Microsoft, you could be vulnerable.

    Lots of computer worms disable antivirus software outright, which can be a tip-off that something is wrong. But Conficker doesn't do that. Instead, Conficker blocks infected PCs from accessing the antivirus vendors' and Microsoft's Web sites, so victims won't get automatic updates and can't download the Conficker removal tools that those companies have developed.

    So see what Web sites you can visit. If you can navigate the Internet freely except for sites owned by Microsoft or antivirus vendors such as Symantec Corp., McAfee Inc. or F-Secure Corp., your PC might have Conficker or a similar bug.

    Fixing the problem gets a little trickier.

    The best remedy is to have a friend whose computer is not infected download a removal tool from Microsoft or one of the antivirus vendors. Then that person should e-mail the tool to you.

    A list of the free Conficker removal programs is available on the Web site of the Conficker Working Group, an alliance of companies fighting the worm. The removal programs will take care of themselves, for the most part, scanning your system and purging the worm.

    One thing to note: Conficker blocks infected machines from running removal tools with "Conficker" in the name. So users might have to change the name of the file (one you've saved the tool to your desktop, right-click on it and select "rename") before running it. The program's instructions will let you know if you need to do this. Many antivirus vendors have already changed the names in their removal tools in some cases calling the file a misspelled variant of "Conficker" to trick the worm into letting the program run.

    Businesses have a bigger challenge, because Conficker has yet another method for evading detection. Once the worm is inside a machine, it applies its own version of the Microsoft patch that fixes the vulnerability Conficker exploited in the first place. So a business running a standard network scan, looking for unpatched machines, might come up empty-handed, even though some computers on the network are infected.

    The scans need to take a deeper dive into the machines on the network something an antivirus vendor's service should enable. For government agencies, contractors and operators of critical infrastructure, the Department of Homeland Security also has released a network-detection tool for Conficker.
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  3. #3
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    i tink i have dis virus on my home computer!!!!!....BELIZEAN!!!!!!........COME TELL MI WHE FI DO!!
    "Men always want to be a woman's first love - women like to be a mans last romance." - Oscar Wilde

  4. #4
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    MI ANTIVIRUS NOT WORKING!!......OH LAWD!!....BELIZEAN!!!
    "Men always want to be a woman's first love - women like to be a mans last romance." - Oscar Wilde

  5. #5
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  6. #6
    ilam96 Guest
    ok, i'm getting scared now. would it help if i didn't turn on the puter all day 2moro...?

  7. #7
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    If you have your Microsoft critical updates you'll be fine.
    Go to Control Panel and Windows Update...I set mine to automatically update like at 2am cause my computer is always on.

    If you computer is mostly off, set it to notify you and you'll see the icon by the clock when there's an update.

  8. #8
    ilam96 Guest
    well i updated the last time on march 24th and i have no more available updates, so i should be safe. my pc is always on too. is the risk higher?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ilam96 View Post
    well i updated the last time on march 24th and i have no more available updates, so i should be safe. my pc is always on too. is the risk higher?
    Not really...as long as you're updated with critical updates and anti-virus you'll be fine. Oh, and stay away from strange links!

    Do y'all get those crazy links thru MSN Messenger from people on your contacts? Never click on those!!
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  10. #10
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    I have service pak 3 so all my comps are updated automatically. I checked anyway and all is well. I did a good clean-up on both anyway. I did it so well that I couldn't log into chat to save my soul....I made no mistake with the password etc...lone rass mein....but finally it logged me in...
    Love is a many splendid thing and food run a close second.

  11. #11
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    Internet hoaxes launched for April Fool's gags


    NEW YORK As the potentially dangerous Conficker worm is tracked throughout April Fool's Day, more harmless hoaxes are firing across the Internet.

    Google unveiled a "Gmail Autopilot." It alleges that it will help you weed through your inbox by replying to e-mails with automated responses.

    The 188-year-old British newspaper The Guardian said it would become a "Twitter-only publication," limiting its reports to 140 characters or less.

    One example from 1927 read: "OMG first successful transatlantic air flight wow, pretty cool!"

    Other hoaxes include upside-down viewing from YouTube, a Web site of smells called smellr (smell-ER) and an "ideological search engine" from Yahoo that filters results to fit your personal beliefs.
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  12. #12
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    Huge computer worm Conficker stirring to life
    The dreaded Conficker computer worm is stirring. Security experts say the worm's authors appear to be trying to build a big moneymaker, but not a cyber weapon of mass destruction as many people feared.

    As many as 12 million computers have been infected by Conficker. Security firm Trend Micro says some of the machines have been updated over the past few days with fake antivirus software the first attempt by Conficker's authors to profit from their massive "botnet."

    Criminals use bogus security software to extort money. Victims are told their computers are infected, and can be fixed only by paying for a clean-up that never happens.

    Conficker gets on computers through a hole Microsoft patched in October. PCs set up for automatic Windows updates should be clean.

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