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stephygee
03-01-2008, 10:31 PM
Considering Mr. Obama was put on the spot and had to "reject and denounce" his unsolicited support from Mr. Farrakan....


Story Link (http://cbs2.com/national/obama.hispanic.vote.2.666693.html)

Obama, Activists Comment On Black, Hispanic Divide
Activist's Remarks Spark Strong Reactions From Local Hispanic, African American Leaders

DALLAS, Texas (CBS News) ¯ Noted Latino community activist Adelfa Callejo told CBS 11 that Hispanics would not support a Black candidate in the Texas primary.

"Obama has the problem that he happens to be Black," said Callejo when asked if it was smart for Senator Barack Obama to reach out to Latino voters.

"When Blacks had the numbers, they didn't do anything to support us," said Callejo. "They always used our numbers to fulfill their goals and objectives, but they never really supported us, and there's a lot of hard feelings about that. I don't think we're going to get over it anytime soon."

CBS station KTVT-TV reporter Jay Gormley asked Obama about the comments.

"Supporters of different campaigns, sometimes in their enthusiasm for the candidates, say things that are unwise," Obama said. "I wouldn't ascribe those words to Senator Clinton. I won't ascribe those words to the entire Hispanic community."

Because Callejo is a Clinton supporter, Sen. Clinton was also asked about the comment. Her campaign has now gone on record "rejecting and denouncing" the statement.

Some of Callejo's strongest allies have also come out, publicly criticizing her sentiment.

"First of all, it's pure nonsense," said Rene Martinez.

"Race is not an issue. It's who'll do the best for our children everyday," added Diana Flores.

Martinez and Flores are two well-known Hispanic community advocates in Dallas. They both have worked with Callejo and both now support Obama for president. Both say Callejo's comments are off-base.

"While I understand some of what she was saying, I'm saddened by it, because he's not to blame for the politics of divisiveness that's occurred at some level here in the City of Dallas," said Flores.

"Her assumption is we've all had the same experience with African Americans as she, and it's not true," said Martinez. "It's unfortunate, because it's not true."

Dallas Mayor Pro Tem Dr. Elba Garcia, a Clinton supporter, said she too distanced herself from Callejo's comments.

Dallas County Commissioner John Wiley Price also supports Clinton. He said, "The words are unfortunate, and those of us involved know it's not factual."

However, in an email to media outlets, Jesse Diaz, president of the Dallas-area League of United Latin American Citizens, wrote the following statement, separating himself from his fellow activists:

"Recent racial tensions and race relations between Black and Latino students at Seagoville High School and Skyline High School indeed gives a brief snapshot of this picture… There may be a few die-hard Latino politicians out there who would want the general public and general media to believe there is a love-fest out there between our respective communities. But go out to the many barrios within Dallas proper and surrounding Latino communities within Dallas County and ask La Raza on the streets for their take on this subject, and you'll see Adelfa has ample support from an abundance of Dallas' Latinos."

"We need to focus on those issues that we all have in common and work together," said Sen. Obama. "That's the goal that I have as president of the United States."


And followed by this interesting analogy I found on the web...


The Latino
Voting Paradox (http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/view_article.html?article_id=01977d91329f30de6b280 53d114e6257)

New America Media, Commentary, Louis E.V. Nevaer, Posted: Feb 04, 2008

Editor’s Note: A Hillary Clinton nomination might win the popular vote, but a Barack Obama nomination would secure the Electoral College, writes the commentator. That’s because, while Clinton is popular with more Latinos, Obama is popular with the “right” Latinos: those who live in swing states. Louis E. V. Nevaer is the author of “The Rise of the Hispanic Market in the United States” and “HR and the New Hispanic Workforce.”

As voters across the nation prepare to cast their ballots on “Super Tuesday,” it is becoming clear that for Democrats, Latinos hold the key to regaining the White House – but only if fewer Latinos vote for the Democratic nominee in the general election.

The paradox arises from the geographic concentration of Hispanics across the country, and the convoluted nature of the Electoral College – where Al Gore won the popular vote, including more votes from Hispanics than Bush, but lost the election in 2000. Because the president is chosen by the Electoral College and not the popular vote, some votes do count more than others. One million Latinos in Texas could vote for Hillary Clinton, but Texas only has 34 votes in the Electoral College. If 100,000 Latinos in Ohio voted for Barack Obama – enough to tip that state in his favor – he would win all 20 of that state’s Electoral College votes. So it is possible for Latino voters in key states to tip their states towards one candidate.

That a similar pattern within the Latino voting bloc is likely to emerge this November – the Democratic candidate most likely to win the plurality of the Latino vote would lose the election – speaks as much to the fractured nature of the Hispanic vote as it does to the peculiarities of the American presidential system. 


To understand the counterintuitive dynamics at play, consider the defining characteristics of the Hispanic vote, which is fractured along geographic and demographic lines. Before Hispanics acquired a political identity and became “Latinos,” they were immigrants or the descendants of immigrants. The Census Bureau confirms that there are more than 33 million Hispanics in the United States. Of these, four out of five are of Mexican or Central American ancestry – “Mexican Hispanics” – and the rest are primarily from the Caribbean (Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic or Cuba) and South America – “Caribbean Hispanics.”
 Mexican Hispanics live mostly west of the Mississippi and Caribbean Hispanics live primarily along the eastern seaboard. Racially, Mexican Hispanics are mostly of European or Native American ancestry, or a mixture of the two (mestizo). Caribbean Hispanics, on the other hand, are of European or African descent, or a mixture of the two (mulatto).

Mexican Hispanics are more likely to favor Hillary Clinton, the principal reason being the affection they hold for former President Bill Clinton. He entered into NAFTA; he was sympathetic to the plight of immigrants; his administration pushed for social programs to help the working man. Commentators who speculate about the reluctance of Mexican Hispanics to vote for a black candidate are off-base, as are those who insist that Hillary Clinton’s appeal is intrinsic by virtue of her being a matron.

Caribbean Hispanics, meanwhile, are more open to voting for Barack Obama. This is the result of various factors, from the fact that, for Latinos from Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic and Cuba, having a “mulatto” in political office is “normal,” to the fact that Obama’s international background speaks to Latinos who commute routinely between their lives in the United States and their families in Latin America. Pundits who look to the racial identity of Obama and Caribbean 
Hispanics miss the point that the affinity transcends mere genetic makeup.

There are, however, distinct patterns that cut across both the Mexican Hispanic and Caribbean Hispanic voter: Latinos under the age of 30 are more likely to favor Obama; Latinos over the age of 40 are more inclined to support Clinton; and Latinos in between are statistically divided between both candidates. And here is where matters of race – “Mexican Hispanic” versus “Caribbean Hispanic” – and of age – younger versus older Latino voters – hold the key for the Democrats.

There is one certainty: Latinos are not a monolithic voting bloc.
 This became clear when my company, Hispanic Economics, was hired to analyze the county-by-county results in the 2004 presidential election for California, Florida and Ohio. In the fall of 2007, these analyses were supplemented by analyses of five additional states – Georgia, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Texas. In the eight most important states for the Electoral College, we found that it is very probable that young “Caribbean Hispanic” voters, while outnumbered by older “Mexican Hispanic” voters, will play a more important role in November.

It is not Latino voters in general, but Latino voters in the tipping point states, who will determine the election – and these voters tend to favor Obama.

Recall that to win the presidency, a candidate needs to secure 270 votes in the Electoral College. Ten states – California, Texas, New York, Florida, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Ohio, New Jersey, North Carolina and Georgia – account for 254 of those votes. A further analysis of the Latino voters in seven of these states reveals a startling pattern: If Hillary Clinton is the Democratic nominee, she will win the most Latino votes – but lose in the Electoral College. If Barack Obama is the nominee, on the other hand, he will win fewer Latino votes – but those he wins will be in the key, tipping point states – and he will win the White House.

This is because Obama supporters in swing states won’t automatically vote for Clinton if she is the Democratic nominee. In fact, most “Caribbean Hispanics” prefer Obama, followed by McCain, and then Clinton. This is partly because many Hispanics are hyper-military-patriotic, one way they "prove" that they are "American." Even though “Caribbean Hispanics” are only 20 percent of all U.S. Latinos, they will in large part determine the electoral outcome of the national Latino vote.

The paradox of this pattern is astounding: For the Democrats, the surest way to win the White House is by nominating the candidate who is likely to win fewer Latino votes – but who will win the votes where it counts most.

bocojeck
03-02-2008, 08:28 AM
A lot of people focus on race in america as if america is the only place with racial injustices.

However a lot of us who migrate from other countries bring our prejudices to america and I am not really referring to Belize.

After learning a bit about the racial injustices that take place in places like Cuba, Guatemala, NIcaragua, brazil and dominican republic, it is fully understandable why many hispanics wouldnt vote for Barrak. In many instances they grew up thinking they were always better than black people and would have never considered voting for a black man in their country. So this concept of voting for a black man is as foreign to many immigrants as it is to a redneck in the south. I think this happens consciously in some immigrants and unconsciously in others.

Its like the old saying, you can take the pig out of the mud, but you cant take the mud out of the pig.

boco

belizean
03-02-2008, 11:55 AM
Let's see if they will ask Hillary to denounce MEChA. Some argue that this Mexican rights group, popular on many college campuses, is racist.

David 13
03-02-2008, 03:11 PM
This just shows how dumb they are, instead of voting on the issues and wo is best to run the country, they are looking at skin colour. Too bad we can't ship idiots like them back to where they came from.

zpania
03-02-2008, 09:34 PM
Politics as usual. Can somebody please explain why we should regard this as a racial issue. . It's not like she is saying black people are inferior to Hispanics. she was simply sharing information derived from her conversations with older Hispanics. If it is true, then it is understandable. I would equate this to people saying they wouldn't vote for John McCain because that would be a vote for the Bush administration all over again. Or,voting for Hillary is actually a vote to have Bill Clinton in the White House again. Or, we can take it a bit further and say, black people won't vote for Bush ( yes, I know he is not on the ballot) because they cannot forget Katrina.



It is only fair that Ms. Callejo be given the opportunity to present more specifics (she has already cited one example)
The media should cut this woman some slack;not everyone is deft at being politically correct. She is eighty four years old, for crying out loud!!! .


I was so annoyed with Jack cafferty on CNN last week for portraying Ms. Callejo as a "crazy old woman." If she were a black person giving such an opinion ,let's say, of a Hispanic person,I am sure he would have used polilte language lest he stir the wrath of civil rights leaders. There is something wrong with this picture. :mad:

zpania
03-02-2008, 09:51 PM
Originally posted by David 13
This just shows how dumb they are, instead of voting on the issues and wo is best to run the country, they are looking at skin colour. Too bad we can't ship idiots like them back to where they came from.



I think you misinterpreted her comment. She didn't say Hispanics won't vote for Obama because they don't like black people. What she is saying is: Because of past experience in which the Hispanic community supported black politicians but never really got that support reciprocated when they needed it, they have since then become disenchanted with black representatives. Can you blame them?

zpania
03-02-2008, 10:14 PM
Originally posted by mellowman
REPLY: QUOTE: "Obama has the problem that he happens to be Black,"


She is affiliated with "LA RAZA" and they -La raza is a bunch of idiot racist! Unless you are trying to act like Hispanics aren't racist too? Please, i grew up around mucho hispanics and i can be just as racist as them yella belly madaf*ucka...


OPPS... I'M JUST JOKING.... HAHAHHEHEH



I agree that some Hispanics are racist. And maybe she is;I don't know. But i don't believe her comment was inappropriate.




It's like saying Hillary has a problem because she is a woman . The rationale being that some people who have had women as bosses - and hated them - won't vote for her because of their bias based on past experience.

zpania
03-02-2008, 11:30 PM
Originally posted by mellowman
Reply: Ok, maybe you did not get to see her interview on T.V. or maybe you dont understand the nature of "La RAZA" ....

In California there is a real street war going on with the black gangs and La raza.... Here is the real terrible problem with that..... innocent young people are getting killed almost every day in the streets of Southern California and whenever a so called leader of the hispanics people make such statements -it produces fuel for more killings...

Dont get me wrong, alot of blacks are killing hispanics too..... and it must stop! its a damn shame!

I may joke around that i am a racist too but the truth is -i am genuine kind and loving person and it really hurts my soul to see these young people just killing each other for no reason what-so-ever........



i understand what you are saying, Mellow. I saw the two minute clip. If what you are saying is true, then i must admit I am surprised that the media didn't mention it.

bocojeck
03-03-2008, 08:41 AM
Originally posted by zpania
Hispanic community supported black politicians but never really got that support reciprocated when they needed it, they have since then become disenchanted with black representatives. Can you blame them?

I think the accusation is just the opposite. Black americans have jumped on numerous hispanic causes and the same has not been reciprocated.

First off the majority of hispanics in this country came from other countries and so were not never mistreated like afro americans. Yet many hispanics and other immigrants arrive in the the US and swallow the stereo types about black americans without question. However they dont have a problem calling themselves a minority to get the benefits. Its like biting the hands that have fed you.

The reality is black americans and civil rights activists fought hard to make this country more fair for everyone and I find it almost insulting that immigrants, would come take the benefits that black americans worked so hard for but still not support them. THat is just plain wrong in my opinion.

Maybe its just the way I was raised but I came to this country also as an immigrant but I recognize the efforts and struggle that african americans did that has paved the way for me be successful. I never forget that and I make an effort to help them out in every way I can. Its called showing gratitude!!! I find many hispanics and immigrants who just want to take and not give.

boco

bocojeck
03-03-2008, 08:43 AM
Originally posted by David 13
This just shows how dumb they are, instead of voting on the issues and wo is best to run the country, they are looking at skin colour. Too bad we can't ship idiots like them back to where they came from.

Well that is a true statement. However teh only problem I have with it is that there are many people who were born here who are also voting by the color of skin.

its just sad.


boco

bocojeck
03-03-2008, 08:46 AM
While we are on the topic, why is Barrack being portrayed as african american???

I know the answer is that he is half black. HOwever, isnt it odd that there are many people who would argue that racial discrimination is a thing of the past, but yet the nation still embraces this racist definition of who is black?

This nonsense that you must have less than 1/32 non white in you to be considered white was started in during slavery and apparently we still embrace it without question.

My point is Barrack has every reason to be considered a White candidate as he is considered a black candidate.

boco

bocojeck
03-03-2008, 08:55 AM
Originally posted by zpania
I agree that some Hispanics are racist. And maybe she is;I don't know. But i don't believe her comment was inappropriate.


Actually, I agree with you. She is honest enough to call a spade a spade. SHe is saying there are numerous racist hispanics who will not vote for a black man.

This is a true statement. The hispanic community may not want to admit this but I actually think the lady is speaking the truth.

Sometimes the truth is more painful than a lie.

boco

Danny
03-03-2008, 10:45 AM
What she said was not political correct , but that is how a lot of hispanic feels. I am not just talking Mexicans , right in Belize people up North think they are better than black Belizeans. I could neva undastand that way ah thinking. Some of these people dogs live betta than dem

bocojeck
03-03-2008, 10:53 AM
Originally posted by Danny
What she said was not political correct , but that is how a lot of hispanic feels. I am not just talking Mexicans , right in Belize people up North think they are better than black Belizeans. I could neva undastand that way ah thinking. Some of these people dogs live betta than dem

Well true. The statements may not be regarded as politically correct but sometimes the truth need to be heard for changes to come.

It reminds me of the criticism bill Cosby took for his statements. Many regarded them as inappropriate and hurtful. However it was the truth and I think it has made a difference and force many people to look at themselves and their behavior

By the way, whether this person intended it or not, I think the effect may be that many hispanics will now vote for Barrack just to prove they are not racist (even if they are). When you think about it, this would still be a horrible reason to support a candidate. Its bad enough to vote for someone based on the color of their skin but equally bad to vote for a person because of concern about what others will think about you.

boco

sweet_lime
03-03-2008, 04:49 PM
:rofl


dyam well what are the racist ones supposed to do then...:D

stephygee
03-03-2008, 05:34 PM
Commentary Link (http://66.218.69.11/search/cache?ei=UTF-8&p=Adelfa+Callejo&fr=yfp-t-501&u=dallassouthblog.com/2008/03/02/adelfa-callejos-comments-about-sen-barack-obama-should-be-examined-by-dallas-mayor-tom-leppert/&w=adelfa+callejo&d=c2-qmnDuQZVn&icp=1&.intl=us)

Adelfa Callejo’s comments about Sen. Barack Obama should be examined by Dallas Mayor Tom Leppert
March 2nd, 2008 ·

“Obama simply has a problem that he happens to be black.” Adelfa Callejo

Last week, Hispanic leader Adelfa Callejo added a disturbing commentary to the Democratic Presidential race. Because of her appointment to a city board by mayor Tom Leppert, her comments should be taken as more than just old conventional wisdom.

In a KTVT Channel 11 interview, the 84 year-old lawyer said “Obama simply has a problem that he happens to be black.” The Dallas Morning News went on to detail an interview with Ms. Callejo where she said Hispanics have told her that they have reservations about voting for a black politician because of experiences in the Dallas area, including fights over funding in the Dallas school district.

There’s more from the Morning News:


“What I hear is that (Hispanics) do not trust that Obama will do something for Hispanics,” Mrs. Callejo said. Mrs. Callejo called such feelings “unfortunate because blacks have a tragic history in the U.S.” Mexican-Americans have had a history of lynchings and other abuses as well, and blacks should learn the history of Latinos in Texas, she said.

Ms. Callejo is entitled to her opinion. Her history as a lawyer and civil rights activist has earned her the right to speak her mind.

But the fact that Mayor Leppert appointed Callejo as chair of the Judicial Nominating Commission should give pause to many. The influential board is responsible for nominating judges to the City of Dallas’ municipal courts.

There is only one African-American male judge -Judge C. Victor Lander- serving a Dallas city court. I would think Ms. Callejo’s comments would be quite troubling to Judge Lander and others who would aspire to serve on a Dallas bench.

Though the contention between African-Americans and Hispanics in Dallas is well documented (especially in the school’s), the decision to extrapolate that into the presidential election was unnecessary. Black and Hispanic leaders are in Dallas and in Texas are working to leave the old days behind and move beyond that.

The support that Sheriff Lupe Valdez has received in the black community is evidence that the perception that blacks won’t support Latino’s is just not accurate. I suspect Ms. Valdez will do well among black voters in her bid to secure the Democratic Nomination even though she has African-American opponents in the primary.

And though Ms. Callejo’s views are not unique, they are not shared by all - especially young Latino’s. Take for example the One Latina’s Blog There’s a post titled Adelfa Callejo Is No Leader and Has No Influence Over Latino Voters Today.

There are also quotes from other Latinos referenced there:

“This whole black and brown divide … is one of the most exaggerated arguments in the country today,” said Manuel Rendon, 19, who introduced Mr. Obama at last week’s rally at Reunion Arena, which drew about 18,000 people. “In terms of the civil rights movement, we know that even though they were different, they were very equal and our struggles have been very much the same.”

Synbad Ontiveros, 37, who works at hip-hop station KBFB-FM (97.9), said older Latino leaders are out of touch with the community. He is still undecided about whom to support for president. But Mrs. Callejo’s remarks “just blew me away,” he said.

…comedian George Lopez made light of the tensions between Latinos and blacks in a campaign appearance for Mr. Obama. …”For all the people who say Latinos won’t vote for African-Americans, I’m looking out in the crowd and 80 percent of us are darker than him, including me. Throw that out the window.”

One Latina’s Blog also rightly points out that Hillary Clinton did not initially “reject” or “denounce” Callejo’s comments, saying everyone has the right to their opinion. I agree with Ms. Clinton, but that’s not in concert with her position in Tuesday’s debate when the question regarded words Min. Louis Farrakhan had for Sen. Obama.

Mayor Leppert must examine these comments, their content and their intent. With such an important position as chair of Judicial Nominating Commission held by Ms. Callejo, its important that our courts and their judges are not clouded by opinions like those Callejo has recently expressed.

zpania
03-03-2008, 10:49 PM
Originally posted by bocojeck
I think the accusation is just the opposite. Black americans have jumped on numerous hispanic causes and the same has not been reciprocated.



Can you substantiate that claim?






First off the majority of Hispanics in this country came from other countries and so were not never mistreated like afro Americans.





Not true.





Yet many hispanics and other immigrants arrive in the the US and swallow the stereo types about black americans without question.



And vice versa. Blacks have been fed outrageous lies about Hispanics.






The reality is black americans and civil rights activists fought hard to make this country more fair for everyone and I find it almost insulting that immigrants, would come take the benefits that black americans worked so hard for but still not support them. THat is just plain wrong in my opinion.



So what you are saying is Hispanics should vote for Obama as a way of expressing gratitude to the civil rights movement and all the black activists who fought for equality.


I thought this Election was about the issues and who we believe can handle the job. Maybe Hispanics are a little selfish in thinking only of themselves and who they believe will listen to their concerns.Maybe they are asking,"what can my country do for me? " instead of the more patriotic ,"what can I do for my country?"



I've heard that one before. Many Times! And it wasn't from the mouths of Hispanics.










:smoke

zpania
03-03-2008, 10:56 PM
Originally posted by bocojeck
Actually, I agree with you. She is honest enough to call a spade a spade. SHe is saying there are numerous racist hispanics who will not vote for a black man.

This is a true statement. The hispanic community may not want to admit this but I actually think the lady is speaking the truth.

Sometimes the truth is more painful than a lie.

boco



And what she said may very well be the opinions from mucho table talk with a lot of seniors and middle age Hispanics. Perhaps, even bar conversations. :drunk

zpania
03-03-2008, 11:01 PM
Originally posted by sweet_lime
:rofl


dyam well what are the racist ones supposed to do then...:D




:D :D :D :D :D




Go back home , You think? that is - to Mexico. :lmao

bocojeck
03-04-2008, 07:37 AM
Originally posted by zpania
Can you substantiate that claim?

without even researching, I can think of three recent examples right off the top of my head.

1) the controversial base in Puerto Rico and the protest against it, the supposed black leaders were right there hand in hand with the puerto ricans

2) the immigration protests a few months ago, had the full support of the black caucus and many other black leaders

3) the immigration reforms which would give "amnesty" to illegals and create the guest worker program has the full support of the black caucus.



Originally posted by zpania
Not True

Zpania, the overwhelming majority of latinos in the US were not decendants from teh ones living in Texas and California who were subjected to the injustices. The majority are people like me who came here legally or illegally and have benefited from minority catergorization that was worked for by african americans and the original hispanics living in Texas and CA


Originally posted by zpania
And vice versa. Blacks have been fed outrageous lies about Hispanics.

You wont get any arguments from me on this one. I really think the two groups should be working together. There are a lot of stereo types on both sides. However we were talking about latinos werent we?


Originally posted by zpania
So what you are saying is Hispanics should vote for Obama as a way of expressing gratitude to the civil rights movement and all the black activists who fought for equality..

Not at all. I agree that the vote should be on the issue. I am saying that the statement if true that latinos wont vote for a black person just because he is black then its even more insulting when you consider the historical perspective of how many of the benefits they currently enjoy came about.

boco

zpania
03-04-2008, 11:47 PM
without even researching, I can think of three recent examples right off the top of my head.

1) the controversial base in Puerto Rico and the protest against it, the supposed black leaders were right there hand in hand with the puerto ricans

2) the immigration protests a few months ago, had the full support of the black caucus and many other black leaders

3) the immigration reforms which would give "amnesty" to illegals and create the guest worker program has the full support of the black caucus.




Now we are getting somewhere ,I'll have to do some research to verify . Thank you.
However, I believe she was referring specifically to the politics in Texas.







Zpania, the overwhelming majority of latinos in the US were not decendants from teh ones living in Texas and California who were subjected to the injustices. The majority are people like me who came here legally or illegally and have benefited from minority catergorization that was worked for by african americans and the original hispanics living in Texas and CA




Hmm, that's interesting. This revelation has provoked my curiosity. I'm afraid i find that hard to believe. If your statement is true ,then it only engenders more questions as to the whereabouts of the descendants of Tejanos who lived through that painful period in Mexican-American History.


One thing we do know is that Mrs. Callejo is not from the recent batch of illegal or legal immigrants who are presently living in Texas ; she has been living there for much of her life. And I suppose she has seen and experience discrimination, along with many of the older Hispanics she interacts with, in Texas.





You wont get any arguments from me on this one. I really think the two groups should be working together. There are a lot of stereo types on both sides. However we were talking about latinos werent we?


Agreed. Actually, it's about the Hispanic-Black divide





Not at all. I agree that the vote should be on the issue. I am saying that the statement if true that latinos wont vote for a black person just because he is black then its even more insulting when you consider the historical perspective of how many of the benefits they currently enjoy came about.

boco



If a Latino person doesn't vote for a black person simply because the candidate is black and his decision is infuenced by stereotypes ,then i have to concede that is racist .


But this is not the case with this woman's comment.

zpania
03-05-2008, 12:08 AM
Originally posted by mellowman

The Mexicans in California have enjoyed major support from black leadership. In the recent Mayoral race, Antonio Villaraigosa was put into office with 73% black vote.... What do you say about that Magic Johnson????



I think you need to give us a little backstory to Mr. Johnson's endorsement.



Blacks Rallied behind him because we felt that he was qualified enough to get the job done and that it was high time for a hispanic to lead L.A......




Yeah,right. Only after being disappointed with themselves over their choice in the previous election.



He choses not to support mr. obama but that is his choice..... Lets go back to the 70's when hispanics were treated like dogs and Gatos on the whiteman farm.... remember the farm labour movement in California???



That pretty much describes the plight of
Hispanics then.





But Zeepanya, you aint full panya anyway... You most definately have strong ingine bloods and i see some Negro trying surface under all mixed up explanation....

:lmao





And you ain't full black either. i bet yu gat some panya ancestors. :D


BTW, i cudn't help but to notice you took the liberty in deliberately misspelling my name.I suspect you are a doing a Bill Cunningham on me. Well Mr. Mellow , or


Mel-Ho

or

Male-Hoe


I hope you are not offended if I return the favor. :smoke

bocojeck
03-05-2008, 07:33 AM
Originally posted by zpania
One thing we do know is that Mrs. Callejo is not from the recent batch of illegal or legal immigrants who are presently living in Texas ; she has been living there for much of her life. And I suppose she has seen and experience discrimination, along with many of the older Hispanics she interacts with, in Texas.


OK lets take a big step back again. I think there is some confusion about what injustices we are talking about.

First off the relelvant standard here is not whether she or current day latinos suffered discrimination. Lets face it even white males today can make that claim.

What triggered the civil rights movement, laws and minority designation were the specific overt acts discrimination BY THE GOVT through its disccriminatory laws and judicial system. The people who made the civil rights laws possible could not legally vote, could not legally compete fairly for jobs, etc. Those were the injustice the civil rights laws are trying to address.

These discrimnatory laws and policy have for the most part been repealed or deemed unconstitutional. The reason these civil rights laws still exist is becuase the effects and consequencs of these past injustices have still not been remedied.

So from this perspective, the people who fought to have the civil rights laws and minority designation really include the people of color who lived in the US at that time. That would be teh blacks, indians, asians and latinos who endured the injustices at the time. They were the ones who made it happen.

The fact that private person today calls a latino a "wetback" may be hurtful but is not the type of injustice the civil rights movement was trying to remedy.

boco

bocojeck
03-05-2008, 03:28 PM
SO Zpania

The hispanic belt in the Texas voted for hilliary almost overwhelmingly. Is this proof that they are racist?? Maybe not but my gut feeling says a good number of them are.

Here is why, I saw on the news last night that hispanics supposedly embrace clinton because of all the pro immigration position the clintons have supported. However this news analysist went through baracks and hilliary's vote on various immigration initiatives over the past 10 years and in fact, Hilliary voted against much more than Barrack. In fact Barrack supported many of them that would have benefited hispanic immigrants

So its either that many hispanics are completely ignorant on the immigration issue that they are supposedly concerned about or are they racist?

boco

zpania
03-05-2008, 10:33 PM
Originally posted by bocojeck
SO Zpania

The hispanic belt in the Texas voted for hilliary almost overwhelmingly. Is this proof that they are racist?? Maybe not but my gut feeling says a good number of them are.

Here is why, I saw on the news last night that hispanics supposedly embrace clinton because of all the pro immigration position the clintons have supported. However this news analysist went through baracks and hilliary's vote on various immigration initiatives over the past 10 years and in fact, Hilliary voted against much more than Barrack. In fact Barrack supported many of them that would have benefited hispanic immigrants

So its either that many hispanics are completely ignorant on the immigration issue that they are supposedly concerned about or are they racist?

boco





:D :D :D Funny you should use the word "proof" cause i was thinking the same thing when i got up today and heard the news. The proof is in the pudding.





I guess they have more confidence in a white woman to make good on her promise . :party

bocojeck
03-06-2008, 07:23 AM
Originally posted by zpania
:D :D :D Funny you should use the word "proof" cause i was thinking the same thing when i got up today and heard the news. The proof is in the pudding.

To be honest I am not surprised, I thinik if you spend sometime reading about race relations in many central amaerican countries, you will realize that they discriminate a lot against indians and blacks too. I think they bring a lot of these prejudices to america. I met a black girl a few years back from honduras who spent many years in nicaragua. According to her, the discrimination against blacks in those two countries are worse than in the US. For starters there are no laws in those countries protecting racial discrimination.

I had the opportunity to spend a few months in guatemala city and it was amazing the way the mayans were treated. Their access to schools were very limited and their roles seemed to be limited to being house servants.

boco

zpania
03-06-2008, 08:02 PM
Originally posted by bocojeck
To be honest I am not surprised, I thinik if you spend sometime reading about race relations in many central amaerican countries, you will realize that they discriminate a lot against indians and blacks too. I think they bring a lot of these prejudices to america.



boco



Not surprise by that. It's hard to lay aside the prejudices that rule our lives for the most part .Although, i must say, I have eaten catfish . But frog legs? No! No! No!.



:D